What You Need to Know.. (Source:FDA)

<p class="has-normal-font-size" id="whatyouneedtoknow" value="<amp-fit-text layout="fixed-height" min-font-size="6" max-font-size="72" height="80">Many adults and children in the United States take one or more vitamins or other dietary supplements. In addition to vitamins, nutritional supplements can contain minerals, herbs or other vegetable substances, amino acids, enzymes and many other ingredients. Dietary supplements come in a variety of forms, including tablets, capsules, gummies, and powders, as well as drinks and energy bars. Popular supplements include vitamins D and B12; minerals such as calcium and iron; herbs such as echinacea and garlic; and products such as glucosamine, probiotics and fish oils.Many adults and children in the United States take one or more vitamins or other dietary supplements. In addition to vitamins, nutritional supplements can contain minerals, herbs or other vegetable substances, amino acids, enzymes and many other ingredients. Dietary supplements come in a variety of forms, including tablets, capsules, gummies, and powders, as well as drinks and energy bars. Popular supplements include vitamins D and B12; minerals such as calcium and iron; herbs such as echinacea and garlic; and products such as glucosamine, probiotics and fish oils.

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The nutritional supplement label
Products sold as dietary supplements come with a supplement facts label showing the spicy ingredients, the value per serving (dose), and other ingredients such as fillers, binders, and flavors. The manufacturer suggests serving size, but your health care provider may decide that a variegated value is increasingly right for you.

Effectiveness
Some nutritional supplements can help you get irrepressible amounts of essential nutrients if you don’t eat a nutritious variety of foods. However, supplements cannot replace the variety of foods that are important to a healthy diet. To learn better and better what makes a healthy diet, the Dietary Guidelines for Americanexternal link disclaimer and ChooseMyPlateexternal link disclaimer are good sources of information.

Some nutritional supplements can modernize overall health and help manage certain health conditions. For example:

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Calcium and Vitamin D help strengthen alimony wreckage and reduce unorthodoxy loss.
Folate injury reduces the risk of irreparable parentage defects.
Omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil can help some people with heart conditions.
A combination of vitamins C and E, zinc, copper, lutein and zeaxanthin (known as AREDS) can slow lanugo vision loss in people with age-related macular degeneration (AMD).
Many other supplements need increasing research to determine if they have value. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does not determine whether dietary supplements are constructive and exceed that they are marketed.

Many supplements contain spicy ingredients that can have strong effects on the body. Always be alert for the possibility of a bad reaction, especially when taking a new product.

You are likely to experience side effects from dietary supplements if you take them in higher doses or in place of prescription medications, or if you use a lot of variegated supplements. Some supplements can increase the risk of bloody or, if they surpass surgery, your response to anesthesia may sweat. In addition, supplements can interact with some drugs in ways that can cause rationalization problems. Here are a few examples:

Vitamin K can decrease the worthiness of the whole blood thinner warfarin to prevent whole blood from clotting.
St. John’s wort can accelerate the spread of many drugs and reduce their effectiveness (including some antidepressants, hereditary drugs pills, heart drugs, anti-HIV drugs, and transplant drugs).
Antioxidant supplements, such as vitamins C and E, can decrease the effectiveness of some types of cancer chemotherapy.
Manufacturers can add vitamins, minerals, and other supplements to foods you eat, especially breakfast cereals and drinks. As a result, you may be getting more of these ingredients than you think, and increasingly, it may not be better. Taking in more and more money than you need can also increase your risk of side effects. For example, too much vitamin A can rationalize headaches and liver damage, reduce unorthodox strength, and rationalization flaws. Excess iron causes nausea and vomiting and can forfeit the liver and other organs.

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Be careful about taking nutritional supplements if you are pregnant or breastfeeding. Also, almost protect against giving supplements to a child unless recommended by their healthcare provider. Many supplements have not been properly tested for safety in pregnant women, nursing mothers, or children.

If you think you’ve had a bad reaction to any dietary supplement, let your healthcare provider know. He or she can report your sanity to the FDA. In addition, you can submit a report directly to the FDA by calling 800-FDA-1088 or by completing an online external link disclaimer form. In addition, you must report your response to the manufacturer using the contact information on the product label.

Quality
The FDA has established good manufacturing practices (GMPs) that companies must follow to ensure the identity, purity, potency and sonnet of their nutritional supplements. These GMPs can prevent the wrong ingredient (or too much or too little of the right ingredient) from being deducted and can reduce the risk of contamination or incorrect packaging and labeling of a product. The FDA periodically inspects facilities that manufacture supplements.

Several self-sustaining organizations provide quality testing and pamper products that pass these tests to provide a quality assurance that indicates that the product has been properly manufactured, contains the ingredients listed on the label and no harmful levels of contaminants contains. These seals do not guarantee that a product is scratch-free or effective. Organizations offering quality testing include: *

Remember
Consult your healthcare provider about using dietary supplements to treat a health problem.
Make sure your healthcare provider is allowed to take dietary supplements in place of or in combination with prescription medications.
If you are going to have surgery, talk to your healthcare provider about virtually all supplements you take.
Keep in mind that the term ‘natural’ is not invariably midpoint safe. Some all-natural botanicals, such as comfrey and kava, can damage the liver. The safety of a dietary supplement depends on many things, such as its chemical composition, how it works in the body, how it is prepared, and the value you take.
Before taking any dietary supplement, use the resources in this brochure and talk to your healthcare providers to articulate these questions

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  • What are the potential benefits for me?
  • Does it have security risks?
  • What is the correct dose to take?
  • How, when and for how long should I use it?


Federal Regulation of Dietary Supplements
Food supplements are products that are intended to supplement the diet. They are not drugs and are not intended to treat, diagnose, alleviate, prevent, or cure any disease. The FDA is the federal body that oversees both supplements and drugs, but the FDA

Drugs must be approved by the FDA before they can be sold or marketed. This approval is not required for supplements. Supplement companies are responsible for having proof that their products are safe, and the claims on the label are true and not misleading. However, as long as the product does not contain a “novel nutritional ingredient” (one introduced since October 15, 1994), the company is not required to provide this safety information to the FDA prior to marketing the product.

Dietary supplement labels may contain certain types of health claims. For example, manufacturers may say that a supplement promotes health or supports a body function (such as immunity or heart health). These claims should be followed by the words, “This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. “

Manufacturers must follow good manufacturing practices (GMPs) to ensure the identity, purity, strength and composition of their products. If the FDA finds a dietary supplement to be unsafe, it can withdraw the product from the market or ask the manufacturer to voluntarily recall the product.

The FDA monitors the market for potentially illegal products that may be unsafe or that make false or misleading claims. The Federal Trade Commission, which monitors product advertising, also requires information about a supplement product to be truthful and not misleading.

The federal government can take legal action against companies and websites that sell nutritional supplements if the companies make false or misleading statements about their products, if they promote them as treatments or cures for diseases, or if their products are unsafe.

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